A crucial aspect in software development is understanding how an application's performance scales as a function of its input data. Estimating the empirical cost function of individual routines of a program can help developers predict the runtime on larger workloads and pinpoint asymptotic inefficiencies in the code. While this has been the target of extensive research in performance profiling, a major limitation of state-of-the-art approaches is that the input size is assumed to be determinable from the program's state prior to the invocation of the routine to be profiled, failing to characterize the scenario where routines dynamically receive input values during their activations. This results in missing workloads generated by kernel system calls (e.g., in response to I/O or network operations) or by other threads, which play a crucial role in modern concurrent and interactive applications. Measuring dynamic workloads poses several challenges, requiring shared-memory communication between threads to be efficiently traced. In this paper we present a new metric and an efficient algorithm for automatically estimating the size of the input of each routine activation. We provide examples showing that our metric allows the estimation of the empirical cost functions of complex applications more precisely than previous approaches. An extensive experimental investigation on a variety of benchmarks shows that our metric can be integrated in a Valgrind-based profiler incurring overheads comparable to other prominent heavyweight dynamic analysis tools. Copyright © 2014 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. (ACM).

Estimating the empirical cost function of routines with dynamic workloads / Coppa, Emilio; Demetrescu, Camil; Finocchi, Irene; Marotta, Romolo. - Proceedings of Annual IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Code Generation and Optimization, (2014), pp. 230-239. (12th ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Code Generation and Optimization, CGO 2014, Orlando, FL, February 15-19, 2014). [10.1145/2544137.2544143].

Estimating the empirical cost function of routines with dynamic workloads

Irene Finocchi;
2014

Abstract

A crucial aspect in software development is understanding how an application's performance scales as a function of its input data. Estimating the empirical cost function of individual routines of a program can help developers predict the runtime on larger workloads and pinpoint asymptotic inefficiencies in the code. While this has been the target of extensive research in performance profiling, a major limitation of state-of-the-art approaches is that the input size is assumed to be determinable from the program's state prior to the invocation of the routine to be profiled, failing to characterize the scenario where routines dynamically receive input values during their activations. This results in missing workloads generated by kernel system calls (e.g., in response to I/O or network operations) or by other threads, which play a crucial role in modern concurrent and interactive applications. Measuring dynamic workloads poses several challenges, requiring shared-memory communication between threads to be efficiently traced. In this paper we present a new metric and an efficient algorithm for automatically estimating the size of the input of each routine activation. We provide examples showing that our metric allows the estimation of the empirical cost functions of complex applications more precisely than previous approaches. An extensive experimental investigation on a variety of benchmarks shows that our metric can be integrated in a Valgrind-based profiler incurring overheads comparable to other prominent heavyweight dynamic analysis tools. Copyright © 2014 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. (ACM).
9781450326704
performance profiling; asymptotic analysis; workload characterization; instrumentation; valgrind
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11385/192543
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