Self-reports are conventionally used to measure political preferences, yet individuals may be unable or unwilling to report their political attitudes. Here, in 69 participants we compared implicit and explicit methods of political attitude assessment and focused our investigation on populist attitudes. Ahead of the 2019 European Parliament election, we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) from future voters while they completed a survey that measured levels of agreement on different political issues. An Implicit Association Test (IAT) was administered at the end of the recording session. Neural signals differed as a function of future vote for a populist or mainstream party and of whether survey items expressed populist or non-populist views. The combination of EEG responses and self-reported preferences predicted electoral choice better than traditional socio-demographic and ideological variables, while IAT scores were not a significant predictor. These findings suggest that measurements of brain activity can refine the assessment of socio-political attitudes, even when those attitudes are not based on traditional ideological divides.

Early EEG responses to pre-electoral survey items reflect political attitudes and predict voting behavior / Galli, Giulia; Angelucci, Davide; Bode, Stefan; De Giorgi, Chiara; De Sio, Lorenzo; Paparo, Aldo; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Betti, Viviana. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 11:(2021), pp. 1-13. [10.1038/s41598-021-96193-y]

Early EEG responses to pre-electoral survey items reflect political attitudes and predict voting behavior

Angelucci, Davide;De Sio, Lorenzo;Paparo, Aldo;
2021

Abstract

Self-reports are conventionally used to measure political preferences, yet individuals may be unable or unwilling to report their political attitudes. Here, in 69 participants we compared implicit and explicit methods of political attitude assessment and focused our investigation on populist attitudes. Ahead of the 2019 European Parliament election, we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) from future voters while they completed a survey that measured levels of agreement on different political issues. An Implicit Association Test (IAT) was administered at the end of the recording session. Neural signals differed as a function of future vote for a populist or mainstream party and of whether survey items expressed populist or non-populist views. The combination of EEG responses and self-reported preferences predicted electoral choice better than traditional socio-demographic and ideological variables, while IAT scores were not a significant predictor. These findings suggest that measurements of brain activity can refine the assessment of socio-political attitudes, even when those attitudes are not based on traditional ideological divides.
Decision, social behaviour, social neuroscience, political behaviour, populism, political attitudes
Early EEG responses to pre-electoral survey items reflect political attitudes and predict voting behavior / Galli, Giulia; Angelucci, Davide; Bode, Stefan; De Giorgi, Chiara; De Sio, Lorenzo; Paparo, Aldo; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Betti, Viviana. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 11:(2021), pp. 1-13. [10.1038/s41598-021-96193-y]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2021 Scientific_Reports Galli_et_al EEG.pdf

Open Access

Descrizione: Versione dell'editore
Tipologia: Versione dell'editore
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.4 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.4 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11385/210195
Citazioni
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact