This article offers a new perspective regarding new experimental paths of urban innovation addressing urban exclusion issues, designed to overcome traditional planning strategies delivered through public services; focusing on the recent outcomes and future potential of the development with a particular focus on the ability of individuals belonging to a local community to act consciously and directly in relation to the socio-territorial context in which they live. The urban exclusion issue is explored building on the scenario traced by the most recent analysis of Eurostat and OECD that show Italy as a country with a high percentage of the population at risk of poverty and social exclusion (18.1 million people) and where the return on investment in higher education is one of the lowest. Based on this context, the analysis observes organizational approaches belonging to social innovation practices playing important roles in achieving education and cultural outcomes, enhancing social transformation delivering open and inclusive learning environments. The paper presents two significant Italian case studies in two different cities that have established “learning environments” to tackle social exclusion fostering the creation of highly accessible spaces filled with cultural and educative functions.

Can Cities Become “Inclusive Learning Environments”? / Fulghesu, Federica; Tricarico, Luca; Billi, Andrea; Missikoff, Chiara. - 178:(In corso di stampa), pp. 953-965. [10.1007/978-3-030-48279-4_89]

Can Cities Become “Inclusive Learning Environments”?

Tricarico, Luca;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

This article offers a new perspective regarding new experimental paths of urban innovation addressing urban exclusion issues, designed to overcome traditional planning strategies delivered through public services; focusing on the recent outcomes and future potential of the development with a particular focus on the ability of individuals belonging to a local community to act consciously and directly in relation to the socio-territorial context in which they live. The urban exclusion issue is explored building on the scenario traced by the most recent analysis of Eurostat and OECD that show Italy as a country with a high percentage of the population at risk of poverty and social exclusion (18.1 million people) and where the return on investment in higher education is one of the lowest. Based on this context, the analysis observes organizational approaches belonging to social innovation practices playing important roles in achieving education and cultural outcomes, enhancing social transformation delivering open and inclusive learning environments. The paper presents two significant Italian case studies in two different cities that have established “learning environments” to tackle social exclusion fostering the creation of highly accessible spaces filled with cultural and educative functions.
978-3-030-48278-7
978-3-030-48279-4
Can Cities Become “Inclusive Learning Environments”? / Fulghesu, Federica; Tricarico, Luca; Billi, Andrea; Missikoff, Chiara. - 178:(In corso di stampa), pp. 953-965. [10.1007/978-3-030-48279-4_89]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11385/196457
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